Posts Tagged ‘civil war’

The bloody: Hezbollah – Iran – Syria/Alawite – Hamas axis

July 3, 2011

Syria Crisis Offers U.S. Opportunity to Break Axis with Iran …www.cnsnews.com › News – 24 Jun 2011 – Satloff was referring to the longstanding alliance between Shi’ite Iran and Alawite-ruled, Sunni-majority Syria, the Hezbollah and Hamas …

http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/syria-crisis-offers-us-opportunity-break

More of: Alawites-Hezbollah-Iran-Syria bloodshed in Lebanon

At least 6 people are killed in sectarian clashes in Lebanon – Panorama.am
14:37 18/06/2011
Gunmen from Sunni Bab al-Tabbaneh district and Alawite neighborhood of Jabal Mohsen, Tripoli, Lebanon have clashed on Friday, “Radio Liberty” reports.
According to the source, at least 6 people are recorded to be killed in the aftermath of severe clashes.
Residents from the two districts have clashed intermittently in recent years, but Friday’s incident came amid heightened tension over the widening popular uprising against Syrian President Bashar Assad. Jabal Mohsen is the stronghold of the pro-Syria Arab Democratic Party, led by Ali Eid.

http://www.panorama.am/en/society/2011/06/18/libanan/

Sectarian Clashes Erupt in North Lebanon – Al-Arabiya

http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2011/06/18/153829.html

Child killed in renewed clashes in north Lebanon – Ya Libnan

http://www.yalibnan.com/2011/06/17/child-killed-in-renewed-clashes-in-north-lebanon/

Kabbara says Assad’s “thugs” targeted Tripoli’s Bab al-Tabbaneh
NOW LEBANON – Jun 22, 2011
Future Bloc MP Mohammad Kabbara said on Wednesday that Friday’s Tripoli clashes are directly linked to current Syrian events. Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s “Shabeeha” (thugs) attacked the rally held in Bab al-Tabbaneh in support of anti-regime …

http://www.nowlebanon.com/NewsArticleDetails.aspx?ID=284546

Seven people charged in northern Lebanon clashes Ya Libnan

http://www.yalibnan.com/2011/06/21/seven-people-charged-in-northern-lebanon-clashes/

Hezbollah weapons used in north Lebanon clashes, report Ya Libnan
June 20, 2011
March 14 MP Hadi Hobeich said on Monday that weapons backed by Hezbollah were used in the clashes that broke out on Friday in the city of Tripoli in northern Lebanon
“The data points toward Hezbollah-backed arms that were distributed in Tripoli,” the MP told the Voice of Lebanon
In a reference to Hezbollah, Hobeich said that “there is a party that is armed and that is distributing weapons to everyone.”
“We only benefit by having security across the country,” he added, voicing hope that the newly formed Lebanese cabinet will work on “disarming all Lebanese, including Hezbollah.”
He said that only the Lebanese government should have the authority to use weapons.
Armed clashes erupted in Tripoli on Friday following a rally in support of Syrian protesters. The military official of the Hezbollah and Syrian backed Arab Democratic Party, Ali Fares was killed and 6 others including one army soldier and a seven year old child. At least 59 others were reportedly injured and some are in serious condition .
Many analysts questioned why the Alawite party should have a military official.
Jabal Mohsen ( home of the Arab Democratic Party) and Bab al-Tabbaneh areas have been in recent years the scene of intense clashes between Sunni supporters of Lebanon’s former PM Saad Hariri and Alawites who are loyal to the Hezbollah-led coalition backed by Iran and Syria.

http://www.yalibnan.com/2011/06/20/hezbollah-weapons-used-in-north-lebanon-clashes-report/

Why Hezbollah Had a Really Bad Week David Schenker July 1, 2011 | 12:00 am Why America Should Be Hoping Bashar Assad Gets Overthrown Meet the Women of Hezbollah Back in 2006, the Lebanese Shiite militia Hezbollah was riding high. Having fought the Israeli army to a standstill, the organization’s leader Hassan Nasrallah declared "divine victory." The war was a public relations coup for the militia, which emerged from the campaign as the most favorable personification of Shiism in the largely Sunni Muslim world. So impressive was the alleged victory that the campaign sparked a widely reported trend of conversion to Shiite Islam in the region. But if 2006 was a divine victory, this week’s Special Tribunal on Lebanon (STL) indictments of four Hezbollah officials and affiliates in connection to the February 2005 assassination of former Lebanese premier Rafiq Hariri, may prove a divine defeat.

While the first reports of a Hezbollah role in the assassination of Hariri surfaced some two years ago, the formal announcement of the indictments will likely serve as an exclamation point to a longer process of depreciation in the group’s reputation that started in 2008, when the organization invaded and occupied Beirut, turning the weapons of "the resistance" on the Lebanese people. That depreciation continued through 2009, when the organization’s chief financier was arrested in a Bernie Madoff-like Ponzi scheme. More recently, in an ironic twist, Hezbollah—which at one time was known as the "Party of the Oppressed"—has emerged as the strongest regional backer of Syria’s murderous Assad regime. Straining credulity, Nasrallah himself has now given two speeches vouching for Assad’s pro-reform bona fides.

Now, for an organization that has long described itself as "the Resistance" to Israel, the revelation that it also specializes in killing Sunni Muslims will, at a minimum, be problematic. Although Nasrallah has spent the better part of the past two years trying to discredit the tribunal, few in the largely Sunni Muslim Middle East will question the court’s accusation that the militia played a central role in the murder of Hariri, the leader of Lebanon’s Sunni community. Indeed, the Arab Spring has contributed to a spike in Sunni-Shiite tensions. Pro-democracy demonstrations in Bahrain, for example, were largely seen by Gulf Arabs as an attempt by the Shiite theocracy in Iran to subvert the Sunni monarchy. In Syria, meanwhile, the rallying cry of the largely Sunni Muslim opposition to the Alawite Assad regime has been "No to Iran, No to Hezbollah!" Given these sentiments—and despite the residual respect for the accomplishments of the organization—the indictment will likely be seen through a largely sectarian prism.

Moreover, the accusations are bound to foment discontent within Nasrallah’s organization, and potentially result in some diminished support for the militia in Lebanon. While they will not come as a shock to anyone, of course, they will reopen old wounds, enraging Lebanon’s Sunni Muslims and, perhaps, disillusioning a few of Hezbollah’s Christian allies. At the same time, some Shiites—Hezbollahis and the organization’s constituents—will likely view the indictments as a liability and may seek to provoke another conflict with Israel, a la 2006, to distract attention from the tribunal. But regardless of Nasrallah’s bravado, Shiites in south Lebanon do not crave another costly war with Israel or a return to civil war at home.

To be sure, notwithstanding the indictment of four of its lieutenants, Hezbollah will remain firmly in control of Lebanon, both politically and militarily. But the organization’s stature in the wider Muslim world will be irrevocably diminished and the change in status of this once seemingly holy Shiite organization will likewise further undermine the position of Iran and Syria in the region. It could also undermine Hezbollah in the eyes of Europe, where the militia has long benefitted from the Continent’s inexplicably tolerant view of the group’s "political" wing. Indeed, given the European Union’s expressed disgust with the ongoing atrocities perpetrated by the Assad regime and its growing frustration with the clerical regime in Tehran, the EU might be inclined to shift its views and finally lump Hezbollah in with these irredeemable regimes.

Until then, despite United Nations Resolutions calling for Lebanon to render the indicted individuals, it is all but certain Hezbollah won’t cooperate with the Special Tribunal. But while the trigger men themselves may slip the noose and be tried by the STL in absentia, the Shiite militia and its sponsors that ordered the Hariri hit will pay a steep price. Indeed, there may or may not ultimately be a conviction in The Hague, but in the Middle East court of public opinion, the verdict on Hezbollah will be guilty.

David Schenker is Aufzien Fellow and director of the Program on Arab Politics at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.
http://www.tnr.com/article/world/91167/lebanon-tribunal-hariri-hezbollah

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No Arab land is occupied by Israel

March 8, 2009

No Arab land is occupied by Israel

Thursday, 8th January, 2009

By Ben Okiror

THE current fighting in the Gaza Strip needs clarification for people to understand its genesis. I accept that the situation is complex, and that might explain why even the US President-elect, Barack Obama has so far opted to remain silent since the war broke out.

However, I would like to bring out what seems to have been ignored and yet it is important for a balanced analysis of the conflict.

Whereas on the surface it is the terrorist group, Hamas, fighting the only Jewish nation, Israel, it is in fact a continuation of the war that Arabs have waged against the Jews since Israel was created in 1948.

The geographic area called “Palestine” was governed by the British after it took it from the Turks at the end of the First World War.

The League of Nations (precursor to the United Nations), according to the Balfour Declaration of 1917, mandated Britain to create a Jewish state in all of “Palestine” due to historical right.

Tragically, Britain did not fulfill its mandate and instead created a formerly nonexistent Arab-Palestinian state called “Transjordan” (now Jordan) on 77% of the Jewish soil in 1922.

Even when the United Nations decided on the Partition Plan on November, 29 1947, Britain voted against it and all the Arab states boycotted the vote.

Never mind that the Plan that gave the Jews only 23% of its original land was not legally binding since the UN Security Council did not ratify it.

In 1948 Britain abandoned Palestine without fulfilling its primary responsibility. Israel declared independence on May 14, 1948 but was attacked by six Arab states the next day.

Ironically, Jordan was led, armed and trained by Britain. It invaded occupied and annexed Samaria and Judea (now called the “West Bank”) as well as East Jerusalem.

On the other hand, Egypt invaded and occupied Gaza. These are the so-called “occupied territories” after Israel recaptured them in 1967.

Incidentally, for 19 years when Egypt and Jordan were in charge of those territories, nobody cared about creating a Palestinian state.

Instead Jordan destroyed 58 synagogues in East Jerusalem and desecrated 38,000 of the 50,000 ancient and modern Jewish graves in the cemetery on the Mount of Olives. They used the stones for latrines and walkways.

In 1967 when Egypt and Syria announced on national media their intention to attack Israel, Jordan joined and attacked Israel.

However, Israel defeated them all and took back Gaza and the “West Bank”, including capturing the Golan Heights from Syria from where it was shelling Israeli territory for sometime.

Due to international pressure, Israel, under prime minister Ariel Sharon, about two years ago, uprooted Jewish settlements from Gaza, from where Hamas has been firing rockets at Israel.

Last week alone it fired about 500 rockets. To those calling for peace talks, how can you talk peace with a person who does not recognise your existence and seeks to destroy you?

 

The goal of Arabs is simple: to wipe out the state of Israel from the map and create the twenty-second Arab state. If anyone doubts me, just listen to what Yasser Arafat, the late leader of the Palestine Liberation Organisation, told a reporter, Arianna Palazzi in 1970:

 

“The question of borders doesn’t interest us…From the Arab standpoint, we mustn’t talk about borders. Palestine is nothing but a drop in an enormous ocean.

Our nation is the Arabic nation that stretches from the Atlantic Ocean to the Red Sea and beyond it….The PLO is fighting Israel in the name of Pan-Arabism. What you call ‘Jordan’ is nothing more than Palestine.” Need I say more?

http://www.newvision.co.ug/D/8/459/667425?highlight

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‘Genocide in Darfur’ – racist pan-Arabism ideology that started its way into the region from Libya

December 11, 2008

‘Genocide in Darfur’ (by Samuel Totten, Eric Markusen) Racist ideology plays an important part of the story, as it has in the history of other twentieth century genocides. And the psychology of “genocide” has become familiar through the sorry repetition of genocidal acts that the last century has witnessed. In 1987, Libya used the northwestern Darfur corner as a backdoor to attack Chad. It had equipped and sent out the so-called Arab legion, an Arab supremacist militia, to pursue Arab expansion in the mineral-rich sub-Saharan regions it bordered and to drive out the African tribes. Libya was not orchestrating a simple border raid on a poor country; it was pursuing a new strategy of pan-Arabism, couched in an emotionally charged ideology.

The Sharp distinction between Arabs and Africans in the racially mixed Darfur region had not been drawn until the ideology of pan-Arabism that came out of the Libya made itself felt… when the GoS tried to impose Sharia Law in 1983, it triggered civil war in the South. This marked the first use of government-backed militias… some of the cattle herding… of Darfur were employed in a strategy of brutality, starvation, rape, and pillage that was to be visited upon Darfur two decades later. Complaints of Arab militia harassment in Darfur surfaced in 2003….
http://books.google.com/books?id=S2a9bDb0qesC&pg=PA30&lpg=PA30

Ramadan Violence Palestine – 11 killed in hamas civil war

September 22, 2008

Ramadan Violence Palestine – 11 killed in hamas civil war

11 Palestinians Killed in a Clash between Hamas and the Dughmush
Clan Memri Latest Blogs – Eleven Palestinians were killed in Gaza
yesterday during clashes between the Dughmush clan, many of whose
members belong to the Jaish Al-Islam Salafist organization, and the
Hamas police…

http://www.thememriblog.org/blog_personal/en/9916.htm